Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ir.sc.mahidol.ac.th/handle/123456789/497
Title: Identification and characterization of candidate genes related to latex yield in the laticifers of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis)
Authors: Panida Kongsawadworakul
Unchera Viboonjun
Keywords: Gene expression;Hevea brasiliensis;Latex yield;Suppression subtractive hybridization
Issue Date: 2010
Publisher: The Botanical Society under the Royal Patronage of Her Majesty the Queen and The Botanical Garden Organization
Citation: Thai Journal of Botany 2013;2(special): 199-206
Abstract: The latex is the cytoplasmic content of the articulated laticifers located in the inner bark of the rubber tree, which are highly specialized in the synthesis of natural rubber. The latex gene profi ling performed by previous studies reported a signifi cant proportion of encoded proteins related to rubber biosynthesis and stress or defense response. However, the expression patterns of these genes are still under investigation. To identify and characterize differentially expressed genes in latex between high and low yielding trees, two subtractive latex cDNA libraries, Latex High Yielding (LH) and Latex Low Yielding (LL), were generated by the Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) technique. A number of 2,726 ESTs sequenced from these LH- and LL-SSH libraries were classifi ed according to their function and/or other characteristics by the ESTDB (Expressed Sequence Tag DataBase) bioinformatics pipeline. Macroarray analysis was performed to identify potential candidate genes. Some interesting genes classifi ed in the rubber biosynthesis group were signifi cantly differentially expressed in the latex of high and low-yielding trees. However, the cellular mechanism leading to high latex yield should be further investigated.
URI: http://ir.sc.mahidol.ac.th/handle/123456789/497
ISSN: 1906-7038
Appears in Collections:Plant Science: National Journal Publications

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